Question: Would Rather Or Had Better?

Is it better not or had not better?

We use had better to refer to the present or the future, to talk about actions we think people should do or which are desirable in a specific situation.

The verb form is always had, not have.

We normally shorten it to ‘d better in informal situations..

Would rather than examples?

“I had rather go home than stay out too late.” “I had rather listen to my parents or get in trouble.” “I would rather exercise than sit on the couch all day.” “I would rather complete my task early.”

What is the idiom for had better?

/best Usage Problem. To be wise or obliged to; should or must: He had better do what he is told. You had best bring a raincoat in this weather. See also: better.

Had better should ought to?

Should and ought to have the same meaning, although ought to is much more formal and is not commonly used in spoken English. Supposed to refers to what other people think is right, while should expresses what you think is right. Had better expresses the idea that something bad will happen if you don’t do what I say.

What is the meaning of should in English?

modal verb. You use should when you are saying that something is probably the case or will probably happen in the way you are describing. If you say that something should have happened by a particular time, you mean that it will probably have happened by that time.

Had been meaning?

“Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural. The past perfect tense refers to something that began in the past and was still true at another time that also was in the past.

Would rather to grammar?

I would rather (‘I prefer’, ‘I would prefer’) is used as a modal auxiliary verb. It is followed by the infinitive (without ‘to’) when its subject is the same as the subject of the next verb. This happens when we talk about what we would prefer to do. I would rather (or I’d rather) stay with you.

How do you use had better in a sentence?

When the advice is strong, use had better with or to show the negative result of not following your advice. You’d better take an umbrella or you will get wet. He’d better remember to wear a neck-tie or they won’t let him in the restaurant. I think I had better take them or they will get lost.

Would rather in a sentence?

Examples: He would rather watch TV than read a book. She would rather be a nurse than be a teacher. The activity you prefer comes immediately after “rather” and the activity you do not have a preference for comes after “than“.

What is had better example?

I had better (‘it would be a good idea if I’, ‘it would be better for me to’) is used as a modal auxiliary verb: I had (or I’d) better sleep now. It would be a good idea for me to sleep now. You’d better discuss this issue with Bruno.

Is it I rather or ID rather?

I would rather / I’d rather Anytime the situation is theoretical, or not certain, you should use the subjunctive (“I would rather”). Don’t forget to capitalize “I”.

What is the difference between would rather and had better?

Contracted would – I’d, he’d, she’d, we’d, you’d, they’d. -She’d rather stay with me than go out with you. Had better. We use had better when we give advice to others.

Would prefer or would rather?

Note that would rather is followed by a bare infinitive without to, whereas prefer requires to + infinitive. Would rather (but not would prefer to) is also followed by a past tense when we want to involve other people in the action, even though it has a present or future meaning.

Would better or had better?

You are correct: “had better” is a strong suggestion, as in, “You’d better speak more softly.” To express that idea in a gentler way, you could say: You might speak more softly. You could speak more softly.

Would prefer in a sentence?

Would prefer can be abbreviated to ‘d prefer. I’d rather go to the cinema. I’d prefer to go to the cinema. Would rather is followed by the infinitive without to.

What is rather than in grammar?

As a preposition, rather than is synonymous with instead of and begins subordinate clauses (clauses that can’t stand alone as a sentence) that have a present participle (the -ing form) of a verb serving as a noun (in other words, a gerund).

Are you into sentence?

Here you are asking a question about an interest they might have or something they might enjoy doing. Here are some examples: “Are you into soccer?” “Are you into trying new things?”

What does Forever and a Day mean?

1. For a very long time, as in He’s been working on that book forever and a day. This hyperbolic expression probably originated as a corruption of the now obsolete for ever and ay. Shakespeare used it in The Taming of the Shrew (4:4): “Farewell for ever and a day.”